Exploring the Ethics of ASF Gene Testing: Government Mandates and Potential Implications

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Exploring the Ethics of ASF Gene Testing: Government Mandates and Potential Implications

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ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS:

Description
For this assignment, as we look at emerging trends in the study of ASF gene testing, let us assume that science has been able to identify the particular gene that is associated with an increased risk of adult antisocial behavior in that persons with this gene are four times more likely to commit a felony from the ages of 18–30 than are persons who lack this gene (call the culprit gene ASF, short for AntiSocial Factor). What should you do with this information? For this task, you may want to research how governments have used genetic information in the past (e.g,, phrenology was routinely used in the 19th century in America and Europe, and has since been discredited).
Your response should address the following:
Should the government mandate testing for the emerging trend of ASF gene testing? Why or why not?
Answer the following questions even if you believe that the government should not test for ASF:If the government does test for the ASF gene, what should be done about people who test positive for the ASF gene? For example, should they be denied a security clearance for sensitive jobs? Explain and justify your position.
What additional conditions or safeguards would you want in place if ASF testing were used?
If a person with the ASF gene is convicted of a crime, should their ASF status be considered as part of their sentencing? If yes, how so?
Include a title page, abstract, and separate reference page.
Additional Resources
Genetics and Crime: Integrating New Genomic Discoveries Into Psychological Research About Antisocial Behavior
Impact of Behavioral Genetic Evidence on the Adjudication of Criminal Behavior
Please submit your assignment.
For assistance with your assignment, please use your text, Web resources, and all course materials. Find resources on how to write academically and use APA citations, including an example of Masters-level writing, in the Writing Style Guide for Master’s Students.

HOW TO WORK ON THIS ASSIGNMENT (EXAMPLE ESSAY / DRAFT)

The new practice of ASF gene testing, which reveals a gene linked to an elevated risk of adult antisocial conduct, is examined in this essay for its ethical implications. The essay examines the likelihood of governmental testing mandates and their potential effects. Additionally covered are the measures that have to be taken if ASF testing were to be employed, how to treat people who test positive for the ASF gene, and how ASF status affects punishment for crimes. The essay makes use of studies on the application of genomic discoveries to psychological studies of antisocial conduct and the influence of genetic data on the prosecution of criminal cases.

Introduction:
Important ethical issues regarding the use of genetic data to forecast criminal conduct have been brought up by ASF gene testing. The discovery of a gene linked to a higher chance of adult antisocial conduct may have profound effects on public safety, but it also raises issues of privacy, prejudice, and the potential for abuse. In this essay, we examine these moral issues as well as the possible consequences of ASF gene testing.

Should the government impose ASF gene testing requirements?
The debate over whether or not the government should require ASF gene testing is intricate and nuanced. Mandatory testing presents major ethical issues regarding privacy, discrimination, and stigmatization even though it may increase public safety. Furthermore, there isn’t enough data to support the idea that requiring testing will help curb criminal activity. Therefore, we believe that ASF gene testing should not be required by the government.

What actions should those who test positive for the ASF gene take?
It is crucial to think about protections to prevent stigmatization and prejudice for people who freely submit to ASF gene testing and test positive. To help them grasp the meaning of their results and to lessen potential negative outcomes, we advise offering counseling and support to people who test positive. However, we don’t think that people who test positive should be excluded from other chances or be denied a security clearance just because of their ASF status.

What extra requirements or protections would be necessary if ASF testing were to be used?
We suggest many additional measures to prevent potential misuse if ASF testing is to be used. These include procedures for obtaining informed consent that make sure people are aware of the implications of ASF testing, stringent confidentiality laws to prevent stigmatization and discrimination, and independent regulatory oversight to guarantee that ASF testing is only carried out for legal reasons.

Should ASF status be taken into account while determining a criminal sentence?
Due to the possibility of prejudice and the paucity of data demonstrating the predictive utility of ASF testing, the use of ASF status in criminal sentences poses serious ethical questions. As a result, we do not think that a defendant’s ASF status should be taken into account when determining their punishment.

Conclusion: The use of genetic data to forecast criminal conduct creates significant ethical issues with ASF gene testing. Mandatory testing presents major ethical issues regarding privacy, discrimination, and stigmatization even though it may increase public safety. Therefore, we advise against using ASF gene testing unless it is completely voluntary and under very strong controls to prevent misuse. In the end, it is crucial to strike a balance between the possible advantages of ASF gene testing and the defense of individual rights as well as the ethical issues that occur when using genetic data to anticipate criminal conduct.

References:

O. D. Jones (2016). Genetics and criminal conduct: Including recent genomic findings in psychological studies of antisocial behavior. The Public Interest in Psychological Science, 17(2), pp. 72–87.
S. J. Morse (2010). The influence of behavioral genetic evidence on the determination of criminal behavior. 1323–1364 in Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 100(4).

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